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The River North Art District (commonly shortened to RiNo) is one of Denver’s hippest neighborhoods. Set just north of the South Platte River, the one-time warehouse district has seen unprecedented expansion in the last 5 years, as a myriad of new apartment complexes, restaurants and bars have transformed its landscape. While it’s become a hot spot for Denver culture, RiNo still holds true to its gritty roots. The de facto epicenter of Denver’s street art scene, the neighborhood hosts Crush, a large street art event that brings the walls of RiNo alive, in September. Murals deck nearly every block of this industrial neighborhood.

Favorite places and best-kept secrets:

RiNo is a trendy urbanite’s heaven. Eccentric galleries (Dateline, Helikon, Svperordinary and MegaFauna, to name a few) are as easy to come by as the artists that fill them. It’s also home to some of the best restaurants in the city. Popular food markets like The Source and Denver Central Market bustle with those willing to shell out a little more for a bite of artisan grub. Old neighborhood bars scattered throughout the ‘hood — check out The Matchbox, Walnut Room, Larimer Lounge and Phil’s Place (they serve some killer fried tacos) — serve as reminders of the nightlife district’s no-frills roots. Trendy restaurants in the area include Hop Alley, Work and Class, Dio Mio Handmade Pasta, Rebel, Meadowlark Kitchen, Cart-Driver, Hop Alley, Little Biju’s Curry Shop, Fish N’ Beer, Beckon & Call and The Populist.

If you’re looking to brewery hop, RiNo is going to be your best shot at getting the most variety in one place. From bigger names like Great Divide and Blue Moon to the smaller breweries like Ratio, Epic and Our Mutual Friend, patios and food trucks abound in the neighborhood making it a great place to rent a B-cycle and hop patios on the weekend. If you don’t like beer, you can pop in to Stem Ciders, C-Squared Ciders or Infinite Monkey Theorem (wine), too.

What’s transportation / parking like in the town?

Parking is not as tricky in RiNo as some other urban centers, but it won’t be easy in the evening, when the bounty of splashy restaurants ring the dinner bell. Save your quarters: Two-hour parking zones — not meters — line these streets. Larimer Street, RiNo’s main artery, gets packed early, so look for spots on adjacent streets instead. If you can ride your bike, do it: Dedicated bike lanes and newly-built lock-up stations means two wheels are often better than four.

Better for buyers or renters? Why?

RiNo has endless options for well-to-do renters, with a ton of new builds popping up seemingly every week. Buyers, on the other hand, will find a very competitive market in the entire Five Points area. Houses are typically scooped-up the second they hit the market.

Other things to know about your neighborhood? (Keep it short)

If you’re looking for a caffeine fix, Crema is a can’t-miss.